Filed Under: "1990s"

Cats (1990s)

December 6, 2017

Flora loved animals, and over the years he created countless images of cats, dogs, birds, horses, fish, and a few alligators. This previously unpublished gaggle of cats, rendered with pen and ink, dates from the 1990s, after Flora had retired from the commercial illustration profession and was spending his retirement creating new works every day. We are considering issuing this as a fine art mini-print.

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The Panic Is On

December 26, 2014

The Panic is On, pen & ink, 1990s, unpublished(No relation to the Nick Travis 1955 LP cover)

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The Fourth of July

July 4, 2012

The work isn’t titled, and there’s no specific reference to Independence Day, but this unpublished 1990s acrylic on canvas suggests celebratory patriotism and civic pride, so we’ll offer it as tribute to our nation’s founding 236 years ago today. P.S. This non sequitur works too. Illustration from The Fabulous Firework Family, Flora’s first (1955) children’s book.

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Friend (and WFMU colleague) Therese Mahler joined us for an archiving visit to (what we call) the “Floratorium” (Norwalk CT storage space) in September 2008. Therese poses with a 1997 acrylic on canvas entitled Queztlcoatl Returns, rendered the year before Flora’s passing. The work was first featured on this blog in January 2008 and reproduced in our third anthology, The Sweetly Diabolic Art of Jim Flora, the only Flora compendium still in print.

Continue Reading... Queztlcoatl Returns (again)

Pen & ink on heavy stock, 1990s, from the archives. Previously unpublished and uncirculated work.

Continue Reading... Self-Portrait with Cigar

Pen & ink, 1992, discovered in sketchpad. Like most Flora works of the 1990s, this cityscape has never been published or publicly viewed.

Continue Reading... Leonardo, Lorenzo and Verrocchio

Previously uncirculated pen and ink from sketchbook, 1995. From the 1920s to his death in 1974, Duke Ellington saw musicians come and go. Saxophonist/clarinetist Harry Carney (b. Boston, 1910) devoted 46 years to performing and recording with the maestro. The trusty sideman occasionally conducted the orchestra in Duke’s absence. After Ellington’s death, Carney was quoted as saying, “This is the worst day of my life. Without Duke I have nothing to live for.” Four months…

Continue Reading... The Duke and Harry Carney

Baba Yaga

January 3, 2011

Baba Yaga, pen & ink and oil pastel on paper, 14″ x 16″, 1996. Previously unpublished and uncirculated late life work (two years before the artist’s death). Wiki entry profiles a dangerous damsel: She flies around on a giant pestle or broomstick, kidnaps (and presumably eats) small children, and lives in a hut that stands on chicken legs.

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outside El Centro

November 18, 2010

Untitled pen & ink, 1994, from sketchpad. Unknown Mexican (presumably) town square.

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Henry Ford in Cetara

September 7, 2010

Henry Ford in Cetara, rough pencil drawing found in 1991 sketchpad. Cetara is in Italy. There’s no refined sketches and no indication the sketch was developed into a finished work. Flora traveled widely and artfully chronicled his globetrotting. This sketchbook contains no other images of Italy, but does contain a letter handwritten in a Mexican hospital while Flora was being treated for “over medication and loss of blood.” On the preceding page was a journal…

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Rowayton Remembered, detail of woodcut print, ca. 1974 My Brush With Historya series by the readers of American Heritage magazineJames Flora’s contributionFebruary/March 1997 (Volume 48, Issue 1) During the late 1940s I lived in Rowayton, a small Connecticut village, with my wife and two small children. I was the art director of Columbia Records, a job I dearly loved. In my work I had many opportunities to meet the musical celebrities of the day, Frank…

Continue Reading... “Mr. Flora, this is Aleksandr Kerensky”

New launch: a miniature (7″ x 8″) giclée open edition print (at $25/ea.) of a previously unpublished and uncirculated mid-1990s Flora pen & ink drawing. Celebrities portrays anonymous showbiz figures as freakshow caricatures. This is our second open edition, low-cost fine art print; Mambo For Cats was launched last October.

Continue Reading... Celebrities (mini print)
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